Tag Archives | roasted garlic

Roasted Tomato Sauce

Roasted Tomato Sauce

I am writing after eating this actual meal for dinner for the third night in a row. All three times I was sitting at the counter while my baby sat across from me in her bumbo, eating the same thing. We both mmmmmm’d our way through it (actually I was the only mmmmm’er, which I do a lot of because it makes her laugh, but she loved it too).

Roasted Tomato Sauce

I (we) enjoyed it so much that I am considering hitting up the Farmers Market again tomorrow for more tomatoes to make it for dinner when my husband comes home from his work trip. That’s how good this is.

(more…)

Roasted Garlic & Miso ‘Butter’ (on Roasted Kabocha Squash)

Roasted Garlic and Miso Butter

This butter is my new obsession. I wanted a savoury spread that was fatty like real butter, didn’t make everything taste like coconut (ok for some things, but not for everything), wasn’t a pain to make and had rich umami vibes. This is so it.

Roasted Garlic and Miso Butter

It contains only three (powerful!) ingredients: roasted garlic (sweet, warming, anticarcinogenic, antibacterial, antifungal), extra virgin coconut oil (antifungal, antibacterial and antiviral, also contains lauric acid, which is great for the immune system and brain function) and chickpea miso (a fermented paste, big umami flavour, great for digestion, anticarcinogenic, reduces effect of radiation and pollution). Phew.

(more…)

Eggplant Aioli

Eggplant Aioli

A side effect of filling up people’s fridges every week is noticing what is already in them. I love knowing what people have in their fridge; it helps me to understand their taste buds and food habits and basically cook for them better. Usually they’ve cleared it out to make room for my food, so it’s just the food in the door of the fridge left.

Eggplant AioliKetchup and mustard, hot sauce, mayo, pickles , salsa, maybe some probiotics and fish oil, it’s pretty standard for most people. I’m slowly trying to add recipes to this site to replace those condiments. I know it’s not a perfect science, the reason that those ingredients are in the door of the fridge is because they keep forever, and I am giving you healthier but perishable recipes. I still think it’s nice to have a healthier alternative if you find that any of those condiments have high turnover because you or your family are actually consuming a lot of them.

(more…)

Perfectly Cooked (soaked) Quinoa

image
(Raw and dry)

I feel like quinoa is new enough (to most of us) that it is still a bit misunderstood. At this point, the majority of us know how to cook pasta and rock a rice cooker, but what about the rest of the grains, especially the whole ones? And do the rules change when we soak them first? I don’t have all of the answers for you today, but I do have one: how to cook soaked quinoa perfectly.

image
(Raw and soaked for 12 hours)

I don’t throw this word around recklessly. As much as I find plenty of charm in nature’s imperfections and messy but delicious food, poorly cooked quinoa is not one of them. When prepared properly, quinoa is neutral tasting compared to many whole grains, and has a less fiber-obvious texture. It is so full of protein, and such an easy (ahem, once you learn the rules) and convenient food to make, that it is only fair that you enjoy it at its best, instead of suffering through it because it is ‘good for you’.

(more…)