Tag Archives | macadamia nuts

Quinoa Salad with Green Veggies & Macadamia Nut ‘Feta’

Quinoa Salad with Green Veggies & Macadamia Nut Feta

This salad is full of all the stuff that you think about eating as you slice off another piece of buckwheat toast for your second meal of avo toast in one day. Even better, it’s the kind of thing that you can make once at the beginning of the week to guarantee yourself at least one solid meal every day that week. You can even make it the following week without getting tired of it by mixing up some of the ingredients.

Quinoa Salad with Green Veggies & Macadamia Nut Feta

Quinoa, the protein-rich non-grain is one of my faves. If soaked and cooked properly, it tastes neutral and has a really nice texture. Soaking it also makes it far easier to digest. If you think you’re not a quinoa fan, try cooking it this way, or take the time to make this recipe (it’s pretty straight forward), and you’ll change your mind. Switch it out for buckwheat or millet, if you need a change.

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Warm Macadamia Nut Bagna Cauda (the best veggie sauce)

Vegan Bagna Cauda

A couple of weeks ago I had the pleasure of helping out an inspiring Montreal Chef with a dinner he put on as part of a tour for his cookbook. We made a bunch of really beautiful food that was creative, exciting and rustic all at the same time. It was the way that he served his veg that knocked my socks off though.

Vegan Bagna Cauda

Usually (often, anyway) vegetables are a bit of an afterthought in the fancy cooking world. When you try to order vegetarian in nicer restaurants, you often wind up with pasta or risotto and not a lot of actual vegetables (trying to order vegan can be even sadder). Things are changing though, and not only are awesome plant-based restaurants popping up everywhere, but non-plant-focused Chefs seem to be embracing actual vegetables in a way that you definitely wouldn’t have seen 7-10 years ago.

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Vegan Goat Cheese

Do you know what makes it a lot easier to eat a vegetable-heavy, alkaline vegan diet? Cheese. Isn’t that what you are missing deep in your soul each time you enjoy a salad or an Italian style meal? You’re not alone. One of my sisters (the lactose-intolerant one…) is always sending me pictures of dishes she has made using my recipes (which I love, btw), often with the comment ‘except I added some cheese’. In fairness, she lives in a part of the world that people travel to for the cheese alone, but I do think a simple nut-based cheese recipe might be a good thing to have in our back pockets no matter what part of the world we live in.

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Dairy on a whole, whether we are lactose intolerant or not, is high on the list of things to avoid if we are fighting or preventing cancer. For starters, it is often highly processed and full of hormones and antibiotics, which can upset our own hormone balance and digestive health. It is also acid-forming, which is not good when we are striving for an alkaline, disease-free body. I don’t love to stress the negative with ‘bad foods’ and create guilt when you do indulge, because then you’re eating cheese and guilt, which is worse than just cheese. If you are going to have a bit once in a while, make sure it is really good, eat it slowly, sitting down, and enjoy every morsel.

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For the rest of the time (the majority of the time), I have new cheese for you. Faux cheese. Raw, nut-based, vegan cheese. If this sounds about as exciting to you as a toothbrush in your trick-or-treating pillowcase, be prepared for a pleasant surprise.

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Beet Salad with Herbed (Macadamia Nut) Ricotta

I remember a time when beets were scary. They were vac-packed and soggy in the produce section of the grocery store, or sliced up in a can, which rarely equals delicious. Despite their endearing colour (purple, you guys!), they fell flat and tasted like dirt.

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Luckily, sooo much has changed. It is now much easier to get beets that recently grew in the ground, often with their greens still intact, meaning their dirt-living life wasn’t too long ago. It’s natural that their earthy flavour still lingers, but that natural sweetness that comes from a freshly dug-up beet is undeniable, and their texture, both when raw or cooked, is something to celebrate too. Oh yeah, and they’re good for you.

They are full of phytonutrients that vary based on the colour of your beets, so by eating a variety of colours (just like all foods) you will get a broader range. They also boast anti-inflammatory super powers, are full of anti-oxidants and aid in detoxification.

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Buying beets with their greens intact is usually the freshest option. The leafy beet greens and stems deserve a blog post all to themselves, so I’m not going to get too into it here, but keep them and juice them or sauté them with some garlic. They are packed with anti-cancer and they taste good too. For this recipe, for me, it was a little bit too beet on beet to use them as well as the roots, but this way you get two meals out of one veg. Bonus.

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