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Vegan Goat Cheese

Do you know what makes it a lot easier to eat a vegetable-heavy, alkaline vegan diet? Cheese. Isn’t that what you are missing deep in your soul each time you enjoy a salad or an Italian style meal? You’re not alone. One of my sisters (the lactose-intolerant one…) is always sending me pictures of dishes she has made using my recipes (which I love, btw), often with the comment ‘except I added some cheese’. In fairness, she lives in a part of the world that people travel to for the cheese alone, but I do think a simple nut-based cheese recipe might be a good thing to have in our back pockets no matter what part of the world we live in.

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Dairy on a whole, whether we are lactose intolerant or not, is high on the list of things to avoid if we are fighting or preventing cancer. For starters, it is often highly processed and full of hormones and antibiotics, which can upset our own hormone balance and digestive health. It is also acid-forming, which is not good when we are striving for an alkaline, disease-free body. I don’t love to stress the negative with ‘bad foods’ and create guilt when you do indulge, because then you’re eating cheese and guilt, which is worse than just cheese. If you are going to have a bit once in a while, make sure it is really good, eat it slowly, sitting down, and enjoy every morsel.

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For the rest of the time (the majority of the time), I have new cheese for you. Faux cheese. Raw, nut-based, vegan cheese. If this sounds about as exciting to you as a toothbrush in your trick-or-treating pillowcase, be prepared for a pleasant surprise.

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Homemade Sprouted (broccoli) Mustard

My ears perk up any time I hear about anything that is famous for being store-bought, being made from scratch in a home kitchen. I had heard mustard was easy to make at home, but had never pursued it, the main reason being that my husband has mustard problems. From guacamole to puttanesca, ‘you’ll never guess my secret ingredient’ is almost always mustard. I started to think about how I could turn this into a good thing (at least nutritionally, some things just taste better without mustard believe it or not) and as it turns out, I think I have.

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Mustard is easy to make. If you have a blender and you know how to turn it on, that is all of the culinary prowess required. Traditionally it is made with mustard seeds, vinegar, white wine and salt. Not bad, but there is room for improvement, especially if we are making it ourselves anyway.

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For starters, lets leave out the wine, I’d rather save up those little bits of wine in my food here and there, for a glass of champagne once in a while, wouldn’t you? And it won’t make a huge difference in flavour. Now let’s swap in raw (unpasteurized) apple cider vinegar for the vinegar. Raw acv is naturally fermented, full of enzymes to support digestion and also has anti-bacterial, anti-viral and anti-fungal properties, therefore an obvious ingredient sub for this recipe. Seaweed salt in place of salt is a given, too.

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Fermented Pickles (Homemade Probiotics)

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The first time I fermented my own pickles, I made them way too salty. I have issues with numbers, which makes following recipes really hard, and apparently results in salty pickles. After staring at them for a while, I saved them and added them (in small amounts) to recipes the same way you might add capers. The rest, I dehydrated, ground up and realized I had invented my own fermented, raw dill pickle seasoning (popcorn, anyone?).

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Chili-Lime Jicama with Muscular Guacamole

Have you ever moved the guacamole to the other room, just to get people out of the kitchen? It works, doesn’t it? Because everyone loves guacamole (even more than sitting at the kitchen bar asking you questions). It is one of the healthiest and easiest to make snacks out there. It’s also really, really delicious. Guacamole even has power over those of us who plug our ears when health food convos come up. It’s that good.

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This makes it the perfect vessel for some muscular activity. I am not trying to change the classic guacamole with this recipe, I am just trying to gently point out a few super-food opportunities. As it turns out, guacamole is one of the easiest places to add some cancer-fighting beasts, and here is a little hint: you’re probably already adding most of them. Now you just need to consciously add them every time you make it, perhaps in greater volume and possibly with a little more variety. Do you add cilantro to your guac? Add twice as much. You don’t like cilantro? (I’ve heard about you!) add some Italian parsley instead. Or maybe some kale, sliced very thin as though it was a herb. Or maybe both cilantro/parsley and kale.

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Do you already add a bit of onion or garlic to your guac? Try adding both. Or if raw garlic doesn’t fly with you, add some roasted garlic. And dice up some red onion (pigment power) and green onion. Same but different, and complimentary. And what about turmeric? I know, I sound like a broken record, but it is a powerful anti-inflammatory. It’s not that I want your whole life to be yellow-spiced, I just want to point out places where it could work. I think it works in guacamole, that’s all. Not your morning millet porridge with blueberries or your tomato and basil salad with almond cheese. I promise not to talk about turmeric in those posts.

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